growing

Myall Lakes National Park


It was my first official day of annual leave from work today and of course it had to start with a good sleep-in, which I might add I’m going to try and avoid doing for the entire period of my annual leave – just the first couple of days. I have been extremely tired, so a few sleep-ins will be helpful – for my health and well being you know. I’m sure you know what I’m talking about and agree with me entirely. I take your silence as tacit agreement. Thank you for that.

Myall Lakes National Park

Once I was up I thought I should do something – so the day wouldn’t be viewed as an entire waste. So a drive to Bulahdelah was on the cards via the Myall Lakes National Park and the Bombah Point Ferry. So that’s what I decided to do, after I thought through a few more possible options for other things to do during my holidays. I have come up with a reasonable list I think – I just need to see them all through now. Hopefully that will happen – just need to keep myself from sleeping-in too often.

Wattle in BloomSo I headed off for my drive through the park, which is only a very short drive from where I live, just on the other side of Hawks Nest.

One of the things you notice when driving through Myall Lakes National Park at the moment is all of the Wattle that is flowering. The Wattle (Acacia) is a native shrub – actually there are many species of Acacia, with the one pictured being Acacia longifolia. Everywhere you look in the national park along the road you see masses of Wattle in flower. With the growing conditions in recent times they all look magnificent.

Of course the Wattle isn’t the only wildflower currently flowering, but it is probably the most prolific of all of the wildflowers at the moment. The Banksia is another very noticeable wildflower that is flowering at the moment and there are several others also.

More Wattle

ABOVE: More Wattle

I spotted some more wildflowers when I stopped at the place known as the ‘Hole in the Wall.’ Hole in the Wall is a picnic area providing views of the coast and Pacific Ocean. It also provides access to the beach. I didn’t head down to the beach, but I did enjoy the view. It is a great spot on the coast here on the Myall Coast.

Banksia

ABOVE: Banksia Flower BELOW: View from Hole in the Wall

Hole in the Wall

So after Hole in the Wall it was pretty much straight to Bulahdelah, via the Bombah Point Ferry, but that can be tomorrow’s post as I won’t be doing a great deal tomorrow. So until then, enjoy looking at that panoramic shot above.

Glitch


Today I am posting a YouTube video concerning the game Glitch. This is a game that is still in beta (entered beta recently) and is being developed. However, there are growing periods of time when the game is open to new users to join and play the game. I have been playing Glitch for some time and I find the game to be quite addictive. It is a complex game, yet quite simple to play – and it is a very social experience as you interact with other Glitchers. I’ll leave you with the video.

 

Dorrigo National Park: Birds Nest Ferns


Today’s photo was taken during my recent visit to Dorrigo National Park in New South Wales, Australia. The photo was taken on the Rosewood Track within the Never Never region of the national park. Birds Nest Ferns can be seen growing on the trunks of the trees in the rainforest.

 

Solitary Mangrove


Solitary Mangrove - Myall River near Hawks NestThis photo was taken on the ferry trip between Tea Gardens and Nelson Bay last weekend, in New South Wales, Australia. The photo is of a solitary mangrove growing in rocks within the Myall River near Hawks Nest.

Landscape near Dunedoo


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This photo is a landscape shot near Dunedoo in New South Wales, Australia. It is a very unusual landform, in that a tree is growing between the split rocks.

New Life: Bundjalung National Park


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This photo is of young, developing, elkhorns growing on the side of a tree in the coastal Bundjalung National Park in New South Wales, Australia.

SWOOPING BIRDS


 

It was the official first day of Spring here in Australia. However, Spring has really been with us here for quite some weeks now, given the very warm days and bushfires we have already experienced. In fact August 2009 was the hottest on record.

plovers and chicks Given that it is Spring it is time for a new season of new growth in the gardens and of new birth in the surrounding wildlife here in Tea Gardens (though it isn’t that clear cut obviously) and there is plenty of wildlife here.

On the way home from work today I was swooped by a Magpie – several times. The Magpie does this in its breeding season to drive off potential threats to its nest and young. Recently I have also been savagely swooped by the local plovers, which attack with even more ferocity than the Magpie.

The plovers had been defending their nest for some weeks prior to their eggs hatching. Their nest was beside the artificial lake in the centre of the village where I work at Tea Gardens Grange. The nest is just a small spot on the ground on which the eggs are laid. In this case their were four. They seemed to sit on the eggs for between 4 and 6 weeks before the young were hatched – swooping the entire time if you ventured too close, as well as making plenty of noise. One of the adults sometimes seemed to pretend to have a bad leg as it hobbled away from the nest in an attempt to get any threats to follow it.

At the moment there are two remaining chicks that are growing fairly rapidly now. The parents are still defending their young with menace.